The agency shall operate a program to oversee the activities of Florida Medicaid recipients, and providers and their representatives, to ensure that fraudulent and abusive behavior and neglect of recipients occur to the minimum extent possible, and to recover overpayments and impose sanctions as appropriate. Beginning January 1, 2003, and each year thereafter, the agency and the Medicaid Fraud Control Unit of the Department of Legal Affairs shall submit a joint report to the Legislature documenting the effectiveness of the state’s efforts to control Medicaid fraud and abuse and to recover Medicaid overpayments during the previous fiscal year. The report must describe the number of cases opened and investigated each year; the sources of the cases opened; the disposition of the cases closed each year; the amount of overpayments alleged in preliminary and final audit letters; the number and amount of fines or penalties imposed; any reductions in overpayment amounts negotiated in settlement agreements or by other means; the amount of final agency determinations of overpayments; the amount deducted from federal claiming as a result of overpayments; the amount of overpayments recovered each year; the amount of cost of investigation recovered each year; the average length of time to collect from the time the case was opened until the overpayment is paid in full; the amount determined as uncollectible and the portion of the uncollectible amount subsequently reclaimed from the Federal Government; the number of providers, by type, that are terminated from participation in the Medicaid program as a result of fraud and abuse; and all costs associated with discovering and prosecuting cases of Medicaid overpayments and making recoveries in such cases. The report must also document actions taken to prevent overpayments and the number of providers prevented from enrolling in or reenrolling in the Medicaid program as a result of documented Medicaid fraud and abuse and must include policy recommendations necessary to prevent or recover overpayments and changes necessary to prevent and detect Medicaid fraud. All policy recommendations in the report must include a detailed fiscal analysis, including, but not limited to, implementation costs, estimated savings to the Medicaid program, and the return on investment. The agency must submit the policy recommendations and fiscal analyses in the report to the appropriate estimating conference, pursuant to s. 216.137, by February 15 of each year. The agency and the Medicaid Fraud Control Unit of the Department of Legal Affairs each must include detailed unit-specific performance standards, benchmarks, and metrics in the report, including projected cost savings to the state Medicaid program during the following fiscal year.
(1) For the purposes of this section, the term:
(a) “Abuse” means:
1. Provider practices that are inconsistent with generally accepted business or medical practices and that result in an unnecessary cost to the Medicaid program or in reimbursement for goods or services that are not medically necessary or that fail to meet professionally recognized standards for health care.
2. Recipient practices that result in unnecessary cost to the Medicaid program.
(b) “Complaint” means an allegation that fraud, abuse, or an overpayment has occurred.
(c) “Fraud” means an intentional deception or misrepresentation made by a person with the knowledge that the deception results in unauthorized benefit to herself or himself or another person. The term includes any act that constitutes fraud under applicable federal or state law.
(d) “Medical necessity” or “medically necessary” means any goods or services necessary to palliate the effects of a terminal condition, or to prevent, diagnose, correct, cure, alleviate, or preclude deterioration of a condition that threatens life, causes pain or suffering, or results in illness or infirmity, which goods or services are provided in accordance with generally accepted standards of medical practice. For purposes of determining Medicaid reimbursement, the agency is the final arbiter of medical necessity. Determinations of medical necessity must be made by a licensed physician employed by or under contract with the agency and must be based upon information available at the time the goods or services are provided.
(e) “Overpayment” includes any amount that is not authorized to be paid by the Medicaid program whether paid as a result of inaccurate or improper cost reporting, improper claiming, unacceptable practices, fraud, abuse, or mistake.
(f) “Person” means any natural person, corporation, partnership, association, clinic, group, or other entity, whether or not such person is enrolled in the Medicaid program or is a provider of health care.
(2) The agency shall conduct, or cause to be conducted by contract or otherwise, reviews, investigations, analyses, audits, or any combination thereof, to determine possible fraud, abuse, overpayment, or recipient neglect in the Medicaid program and shall report the findings of any overpayments in audit reports as appropriate. At least 5 percent of all audits shall be conducted on a random basis. As part of its ongoing fraud detection activities, the agency shall identify and monitor, by contract or otherwise, patterns of overutilization of Medicaid services based on state averages. The agency shall track Medicaid provider prescription and billing patterns and evaluate them against Medicaid medical necessity criteria and coverage and limitation guidelines adopted by rule. Medical necessity determination requires that service be consistent with symptoms or confirmed diagnosis of illness or injury under treatment and not in excess of the patient’s needs. The agency shall conduct reviews of provider exceptions to peer group norms and shall, using statistical methodologies, provider profiling, and analysis of billing patterns, detect and investigate abnormal or unusual increases in billing or payment of claims for Medicaid services and medically unnecessary provision of services.
(3) The agency may conduct, or may contract for, prepayment review of provider claims to ensure cost-effective purchasing; to ensure that billing by a provider to the agency is in accordance with applicable provisions of all Medicaid rules, regulations, handbooks, and policies and in accordance with federal, state, and local law; and to ensure that appropriate care is rendered to Medicaid recipients. Such prepayment reviews may be conducted as determined appropriate by the agency, without any suspicion or allegation of fraud, abuse, or neglect, and may last for up to 1 year. Unless the agency has reliable evidence of fraud, misrepresentation, abuse, or neglect, claims shall be adjudicated for denial or payment within 90 days after receipt of complete documentation by the agency for review. If there is reliable evidence of fraud, misrepresentation, abuse, or neglect, claims shall be adjudicated for denial of payment within 180 days after receipt of complete documentation by the agency for review.
(4) Any suspected criminal violation identified by the agency must be referred to the Medicaid Fraud Control Unit of the Office of the Attorney General for investigation. The agency and the Attorney General shall enter into a memorandum of understanding, which must include, but need not be limited to, a protocol for regularly sharing information and coordinating casework. The protocol must establish a procedure for the referral by the agency of cases involving suspected Medicaid fraud to the Medicaid Fraud Control Unit for investigation, and the return to the agency of those cases where investigation determines that administrative action by the agency is appropriate. Offices of the Medicaid program integrity program and the Medicaid Fraud Control Unit of the Department of Legal Affairs, shall, to the extent possible, be collocated. The agency and the Department of Legal Affairs shall periodically conduct joint training and other joint activities designed to increase communication and coordination in recovering overpayments.
(5) A Medicaid provider is subject to having goods and services that are paid for by the Medicaid program reviewed by an appropriate peer-review organization designated by the agency. The written findings of the applicable peer-review organization are admissible in any court or administrative proceeding as evidence of medical necessity or the lack thereof.
(6) Any notice required to be given to a provider under this section is presumed to be sufficient notice if sent to the address last shown on the provider enrollment file. It is the responsibility of the provider to furnish and keep the agency informed of the provider’s current address. United States Postal Service proof of mailing or certified or registered mailing of such notice to the provider at the address shown on the provider enrollment file constitutes sufficient proof of notice. Any notice required to be given to the agency by this section must be sent to the agency at an address designated by rule.
(7) When presenting a claim for payment under the Medicaid program, a provider has an affirmative duty to supervise the provision of, and be responsible for, goods and services claimed to have been provided, to supervise and be responsible for preparation and submission of the claim, and to present a claim that is true and accurate and that is for goods and services that:
(a) Have actually been furnished to the recipient by the provider prior to submitting the claim.
(b) Are Medicaid-covered goods or services that are medically necessary.
(c) Are of a quality comparable to those furnished to the general public by the provider’s peers.
(d) Have not been billed in whole or in part to a recipient or a recipient’s responsible party, except for such copayments, coinsurance, or deductibles as are authorized by the agency.
(e) Are provided in accord with applicable provisions of all Medicaid rules, regulations, handbooks, and policies and in accordance with federal, state, and local law.
(f) Are documented by records made at the time the goods or services were provided, demonstrating the medical necessity for the goods or services rendered. Medicaid goods or services are excessive or not medically necessary unless both the medical basis and the specific need for them are fully and properly documented in the recipient’s medical record.

The agency shall deny payment or require repayment for goods or services that are not presented as required in this subsection.

(8) The agency shall not reimburse any person or entity for any prescription for medications, medical supplies, or medical services if the prescription was written by a physician or other prescribing practitioner who is not enrolled in the Medicaid program. This section does not apply:
(a) In instances involving bona fide emergency medical conditions as determined by the agency;
(b) To a provider of medical services to a patient in a hospital emergency department, hospital inpatient or outpatient setting, or nursing home;
(c) To bona fide pro bono services by preapproved non-Medicaid providers as determined by the agency;
(d) To prescribing physicians who are board-certified specialists treating Medicaid recipients referred for treatment by a treating physician who is enrolled in the Medicaid program;
(e) To prescriptions written for dually eligible Medicare beneficiaries by an authorized Medicare provider who is not enrolled in the Medicaid program;
(f) To other physicians who are not enrolled in the Medicaid program but who provide a medically necessary service or prescription not otherwise reasonably available from a Medicaid-enrolled physician; or
(9) A Medicaid provider shall retain medical, professional, financial, and business records pertaining to services and goods furnished to a Medicaid recipient and billed to Medicaid for a period of 5 years after the date of furnishing such services or goods. The agency may investigate, review, or analyze such records, which must be made available during normal business hours. However, 24-hour notice must be provided if patient treatment would be disrupted. The provider must keep the agency informed of the location of the provider’s Medicaid-related records. The authority of the agency to obtain Medicaid-related records from a provider is neither curtailed nor limited during a period of litigation between the agency and the provider.
(10) Payments for the services of billing agents or persons participating in the preparation of a Medicaid claim shall not be based on amounts for which they bill nor based on the amount a provider receives from the Medicaid program.
(11) The agency shall deny payment or require repayment for inappropriate, medically unnecessary, or excessive goods or services from the person furnishing them, the person under whose supervision they were furnished, or the person causing them to be furnished.
(12) The complaint and all information obtained pursuant to an investigation of a Medicaid provider, or the authorized representative or agent of a provider, relating to an allegation of fraud, abuse, or neglect are confidential and exempt from the provisions of s. 119.07(1):
(a) Until the agency takes final agency action with respect to the provider and requires repayment of any overpayment, or imposes an administrative sanction;
(b) Until the Attorney General refers the case for criminal prosecution;
(c) Until 10 days after the complaint is determined without merit; or
(d) At all times if the complaint or information is otherwise protected by law.
(13) The agency shall terminate participation of a Medicaid provider in the Medicaid program and may seek civil remedies or impose other administrative sanctions against a Medicaid provider, if the provider or any principal, officer, director, agent, managing employee, or affiliated person of the provider, or any partner or shareholder having an ownership interest in the provider equal to 5 percent or greater, has been convicted of a criminal offense under federal law or the law of any state relating to the practice of the provider’s profession, or a criminal offense listed under s. 408.809(4), s. 409.907(10), or s. 435.04(2). If the agency determines that the provider did not participate or acquiesce in the offense, termination will not be imposed. If the agency effects a termination under this subsection, the agency shall take final agency action.
(14) If the provider has been suspended or terminated from participation in the Medicaid program or the Medicare program by the Federal Government or any state, the agency must immediately suspend or terminate, as appropriate, the provider’s participation in this state’s Medicaid program for a period no less than that imposed by the Federal Government or any other state, and may not enroll such provider in this state’s Medicaid program while such foreign suspension or termination remains in effect. The agency shall also immediately suspend or terminate, as appropriate, a provider’s participation in this state’s Medicaid program if the provider participated or acquiesced in any action for which any principal, officer, director, agent, managing employee, or affiliated person of the provider, or any partner or shareholder having an ownership interest in the provider equal to 5 percent or greater, was suspended or terminated from participating in the Medicaid program or the Medicare program by the Federal Government or any state. This sanction is in addition to all other remedies provided by law.
(15) The agency shall seek a remedy provided by law, including, but not limited to, any remedy provided in subsections (13) and (16) and s. 812.035, if:
(a) The provider’s license has not been renewed, or has been revoked, suspended, or terminated, for cause, by the licensing agency of any state;
(b) The provider has failed to make available or has refused access to Medicaid-related records to an auditor, investigator, or other authorized employee or agent of the agency, the Attorney General, a state attorney, or the Federal Government;
(c) The provider has not furnished or has failed to make available such Medicaid-related records as the agency has found necessary to determine whether Medicaid payments are or were due and the amounts thereof;
(d) The provider has failed to maintain medical records made at the time of service, or prior to service if prior authorization is required, demonstrating the necessity and appropriateness of the goods or services rendered;
(e) The provider is not in compliance with provisions of Medicaid provider publications that have been adopted by reference as rules in the Florida Administrative Code; with provisions of state or federal laws, rules, or regulations; with provisions of the provider agreement between the agency and the provider; or with certifications found on claim forms or on transmittal forms for electronically submitted claims that are submitted by the provider or authorized representative, as such provisions apply to the Medicaid program;
(f) The provider or person who ordered, authorized, or prescribed the care, services, or supplies has furnished, or ordered or authorized the furnishing of, goods or services to a recipient which are inappropriate, unnecessary, excessive, or harmful to the recipient or are of inferior quality;
(g) The provider has demonstrated a pattern of failure to provide goods or services that are medically necessary;
(h) The provider or an authorized representative of the provider, or a person who ordered, authorized, or prescribed the goods or services, has submitted or caused to be submitted false or a pattern of erroneous Medicaid claims;
(i) The provider or an authorized representative of the provider, or a person who has ordered, authorized, or prescribed the goods or services, has submitted or caused to be submitted a Medicaid provider enrollment application, a request for prior authorization for Medicaid services, a drug exception request, or a Medicaid cost report that contains materially false or incorrect information;
(j) The provider or an authorized representative of the provider has collected from or billed a recipient or a recipient’s responsible party improperly for amounts that should not have been so collected or billed by reason of the provider’s billing the Medicaid program for the same service;
(k) The provider or an authorized representative of the provider has included in a cost report costs that are not allowable under a Florida Title XIX reimbursement plan after the provider or authorized representative had been advised in an audit exit conference or audit report that the costs were not allowable;
(l) The provider is charged by information or indictment with fraudulent billing practices or an offense referenced in subsection (13). The sanction applied for this reason is limited to suspension of the provider’s participation in the Medicaid program for the duration of the indictment unless the provider is found guilty pursuant to the information or indictment;
(m) The provider or a person who ordered, authorized, or prescribed the goods or services is found liable for negligent practice resulting in death or injury to the provider’s patient;
(n) The provider fails to demonstrate that it had available during a specific audit or review period sufficient quantities of goods, or sufficient time in the case of services, to support the provider’s billings to the Medicaid program;
(o) The provider has failed to comply with the notice and reporting requirements of s. 409.907;
(p) The agency has received reliable information of patient abuse or neglect or of any act prohibited by s. 409.920; or
(q) The provider has failed to comply with an agreed-upon repayment schedule.

A provider is subject to sanctions for violations of this subsection as the result of actions or inactions of the provider, or actions or inactions of any principal, officer, director, agent, managing employee, or affiliated person of the provider, or any partner or shareholder having an ownership interest in the provider equal to 5 percent or greater, in which the provider participated or acquiesced.

(16) The agency shall impose any of the following sanctions or disincentives on a provider or a person for any of the acts described in subsection (15):
(a) Suspension for a specific period of time of not more than 1 year. Suspension precludes participation in the Medicaid program, which includes any action that results in a claim for payment to the Medicaid program for furnishing, supervising a person who is furnishing, or causing a person to furnish goods or services.
(b) Termination for a specific period of time ranging from more than 1 year to 20 years. Termination precludes participation in the Medicaid program, which includes any action that results in a claim for payment to the Medicaid program for furnishing, supervising a person who is furnishing, or causing a person to furnish goods or services.
(c) Imposition of a fine of up to $5,000 for each violation. Each day that an ongoing violation continues, such as refusing to furnish Medicaid-related records or refusing access to records, is considered a separate violation. Each instance of improper billing of a Medicaid recipient; each instance of including an unallowable cost on a hospital or nursing home Medicaid cost report after the provider or authorized representative has been advised in an audit exit conference or previous audit report of the cost unallowability; each instance of furnishing a Medicaid recipient goods or professional services that are inappropriate or of inferior quality as determined by competent peer judgment; each instance of knowingly submitting a materially false or erroneous Medicaid provider enrollment application, request for prior authorization for Medicaid services, drug exception request, or cost report; each instance of inappropriate prescribing of drugs for a Medicaid recipient as determined by competent peer judgment; and each false or erroneous Medicaid claim leading to an overpayment to a provider is considered a separate violation.
(d) Immediate suspension, if the agency has received information of patient abuse or neglect or of any act prohibited by s. 409.920. Upon suspension, the agency must issue an immediate final order under s. 120.569(2)(n).
(e) A fine, not to exceed $10,000, for a violation of paragraph (15)(i).
(f) Imposition of liens against provider assets, including, but not limited to, financial assets and real property, not to exceed the amount of fines or recoveries sought, upon entry of an order determining that such moneys are due or recoverable.
(g) Prepayment reviews of claims for a specified period of time.
(h) Comprehensive followup reviews of providers every 6 months to ensure that they are billing Medicaid correctly.
(i) Corrective-action plans that remain in effect for up to 3 years and that are monitored by the agency every 6 months while in effect.
(j) Other remedies as permitted by law to effect the recovery of a fine or overpayment.

If a provider voluntarily relinquishes its Medicaid provider number or an associated license, or allows the associated licensure to expire after receiving written notice that the agency is conducting, or has conducted, an audit, survey, inspection, or investigation and that a sanction of suspension or termination will or would be imposed for noncompliance discovered as a result of the audit, survey, inspection, or investigation, the agency shall impose the sanction of termination for cause against the provider. The agency’s termination with cause is subject to hearing rights as may be provided under chapter 120. The Secretary of Health Care Administration may make a determination that imposition of a sanction or disincentive is not in the best interest of the Medicaid program, in which case a sanction or disincentive may not be imposed.

(17) In determining the appropriate administrative sanction to be applied, or the duration of any suspension or termination, the agency shall consider:
(a) The seriousness and extent of the violation or violations.
(b) Any prior history of violations by the provider relating to the delivery of health care programs which resulted in either a criminal conviction or in administrative sanction or penalty.
(c) Evidence of continued violation within the provider’s management control of Medicaid statutes, rules, regulations, or policies after written notification to the provider of improper practice or instance of violation.
(d) The effect, if any, on the quality of medical care provided to Medicaid recipients as a result of the acts of the provider.
(e) Any action by a licensing agency respecting the provider in any state in which the provider operates or has operated.
(f) The apparent impact on access by recipients to Medicaid services if the provider is suspended or terminated, in the best judgment of the agency.

The agency shall document the basis for all sanctioning actions and recommendations.

(18) The agency may take action to sanction, suspend, or terminate a particular provider working for a group provider, and may suspend or terminate Medicaid participation at a specific location, rather than or in addition to taking action against an entire group.
(19) The agency shall establish a process for conducting followup reviews of a sampling of providers who have a history of overpayment under the Medicaid program. This process must consider the magnitude of previous fraud or abuse and the potential effect of continued fraud or abuse on Medicaid costs.
(20) In making a determination of overpayment to a provider, the agency must use accepted and valid auditing, accounting, analytical, statistical, or peer-review methods, or combinations thereof. Appropriate statistical methods may include, but are not limited to, sampling and extension to the population, parametric and nonparametric statistics, tests of hypotheses, and other generally accepted statistical methods. Appropriate analytical methods may include, but are not limited to, reviews to determine variances between the quantities of products that a provider had on hand and available to be purveyed to Medicaid recipients during the review period and the quantities of the same products paid for by the Medicaid program for the same period, taking into appropriate consideration sales of the same products to non-Medicaid customers during the same period. In meeting its burden of proof in any administrative or court proceeding, the agency may introduce the results of such statistical methods as evidence of overpayment.
(21) When making a determination that an overpayment has occurred, the agency shall prepare and issue an audit report to the provider showing the calculation of overpayments. The agency’s determination must be based solely upon information available to it before issuance of the audit report and, in the case of documentation obtained to substantiate claims for Medicaid reimbursement, based solely upon contemporaneous records. The agency may consider addenda or modifications to a note that was made contemporaneously with the patient care episode if the addenda or modifications are germane to the note.
(22) The audit report, supported by agency work papers, showing an overpayment to a provider constitutes evidence of the overpayment. A provider may not present or elicit testimony on direct examination or cross-examination in any court or administrative proceeding, regarding the purchase or acquisition by any means of drugs, goods, or supplies; sales or divestment by any means of drugs, goods, or supplies; or inventory of drugs, goods, or supplies, unless such acquisition, sales, divestment, or inventory is documented by written invoices, written inventory records, or other competent written documentary evidence maintained in the normal course of the provider’s business. A provider may not present records to contest an overpayment or sanction unless such records are contemporaneous and, if requested during the audit process, were furnished to the agency or its agent upon request. This limitation does not apply to Medicaid cost report audits. This limitation does not preclude consideration by the agency of addenda or modifications to a note if the addenda or modifications are made before notification of the audit, the addenda or modifications are germane to the note, and the note was made contemporaneously with a patient care episode. Notwithstanding the applicable rules of discovery, all documentation to be offered as evidence at an administrative hearing on a Medicaid overpayment or an administrative sanction must be exchanged by all parties at least 14 days before the administrative hearing or be excluded from consideration.
(23)(a) In an audit or investigation of a violation committed by a provider which is conducted pursuant to this section, the agency is entitled to recover all investigative, legal, and expert witness costs if the agency’s findings were not contested by the provider or, if contested, the agency ultimately prevailed.
(b) The agency has the burden of documenting the costs, which include salaries and employee benefits and out-of-pocket expenses. The amount of costs that may be recovered must be reasonable in relation to the seriousness of the violation and must be set taking into consideration the financial resources, earning ability, and needs of the provider, who has the burden of demonstrating such factors.
(c) The provider may pay the costs over a period to be determined by the agency if the agency determines that an extreme hardship would result to the provider from immediate full payment. Any default in payment of costs may be collected by any means authorized by law.
(24) If the agency imposes an administrative sanction pursuant to subsection (13), subsection (14), or subsection (15), except paragraphs (15)(e) and (o), upon any provider or any principal, officer, director, agent, managing employee, or affiliated person of the provider who is regulated by another state entity, the agency shall notify that other entity of the imposition of the sanction within 5 business days. Such notification must include the provider’s or person’s name and license number and the specific reasons for sanction.
(25)(a) The agency shall withhold Medicaid payments, in whole or in part, to a provider upon receipt of reliable evidence that the circumstances giving rise to the need for a withholding of payments involve fraud, willful misrepresentation, or abuse under the Medicaid program, or a crime committed while rendering goods or services to Medicaid recipients. If it is determined that fraud, willful misrepresentation, abuse, or a crime did not occur, the payments withheld must be paid to the provider within 14 days after such determination. Amounts not paid within 14 days accrue interest at the rate of 10 percent per year, beginning after the 14th day.
(b) The agency shall deny payment, or require repayment, if the goods or services were furnished, supervised, or caused to be furnished by a person who has been suspended or terminated from the Medicaid program or Medicare program by the Federal Government or any state.
(c) Overpayments owed to the agency bear interest at the rate of 10 percent per year from the date of final determination of the overpayment by the agency, and payment arrangements must be made within 30 days after the date of the final order, which is not subject to further appeal.
(d) The agency, upon entry of a final agency order, a judgment or order of a court of competent jurisdiction, or a stipulation or settlement, may collect the moneys owed by all means allowable by law, including, but not limited to, notifying any fiscal intermediary of Medicare benefits that the state has a superior right of payment. Upon receipt of such written notification, the Medicare fiscal intermediary shall remit to the state the sum claimed.
(e) The agency may institute amnesty programs to allow Medicaid providers the opportunity to voluntarily repay overpayments. The agency may adopt rules to administer such programs.
(26) The agency may impose administrative sanctions against a Medicaid recipient, or the agency may seek any other remedy provided by law, including, but not limited to, the remedies provided in s. 812.035, if the agency finds that a recipient has engaged in solicitation in violation of s. 409.920 or that the recipient has otherwise abused the Medicaid program.
(27) When the Agency for Health Care Administration has made a probable cause determination and alleged that an overpayment to a Medicaid provider has occurred, the agency, after notice to the provider, shall:
(a) Withhold, and continue to withhold during the pendency of an administrative hearing pursuant to chapter 120, any medical assistance reimbursement payments until such time as the overpayment is recovered, unless within 30 days after receiving notice thereof the provider:
1. Makes repayment in full; or
2. Establishes a repayment plan that is satisfactory to the Agency for Health Care Administration.
(b) Withhold, and continue to withhold during the pendency of an administrative hearing pursuant to chapter 120, medical assistance reimbursement payments if the terms of a repayment plan are not adhered to by the provider.
(28) Venue for all Medicaid program integrity cases lies in Leon County, at the discretion of the agency.
(29) Notwithstanding other provisions of law, the agency and the Medicaid Fraud Control Unit of the Department of Legal Affairs may review a provider’s Medicaid-related and non-Medicaid-related records in order to determine the total output of a provider’s practice to reconcile quantities of goods or services billed to Medicaid with quantities of goods or services used in the provider’s total practice.
(30) The agency shall terminate a provider’s participation in the Medicaid program if the provider fails to reimburse an overpayment or pay an agency-imposed fine that has been determined by final order, not subject to further appeal, within 30 days after the date of the final order, unless the provider and the agency have entered into a repayment agreement.
(31) If a provider requests an administrative hearing pursuant to chapter 120, such hearing must be conducted within 90 days following assignment of an administrative law judge, absent exceptionally good cause shown as determined by the administrative law judge or hearing officer. Upon issuance of a final order, the outstanding balance of the amount determined to constitute the overpayment and fines is due. If a provider fails to make payments in full, fails to enter into a satisfactory repayment plan, or fails to comply with the terms of a repayment plan or settlement agreement, the agency shall withhold reimbursement payments for Medicaid services until the amount due is paid in full.
(32) Duly authorized agents and employees of the agency shall have the power to inspect, during normal business hours, the records of any pharmacy, wholesale establishment, or manufacturer, or any other place in which drugs and medical supplies are manufactured, packed, packaged, made, stored, sold, or kept for sale, for the purpose of verifying the amount of drugs and medical supplies ordered, delivered, or purchased by a provider. The agency shall provide at least 2 business days’ prior notice of any such inspection. The notice must identify the provider whose records will be inspected, and the inspection shall include only records specifically related to that provider.
(33) In accordance with federal law, Medicaid recipients convicted of a crime pursuant to 42 U.S.C. s. 1320a-7b may be limited, restricted, or suspended from Medicaid eligibility for a period not to exceed 1 year, as determined by the agency head or designee.
(34) To deter fraud and abuse in the Medicaid program, the agency may limit the number of Schedule II and Schedule III refill prescription claims submitted from a pharmacy provider. The agency shall limit the allowable amount of reimbursement of prescription refill claims for Schedule II and Schedule III pharmaceuticals if the agency or the Medicaid Fraud Control Unit determines that the specific prescription refill was not requested by the Medicaid recipient or authorized representative for whom the refill claim is submitted or was not prescribed by the recipient’s medical provider or physician. Any such refill request must be consistent with the original prescription.
(35) The Office of Program Policy Analysis and Government Accountability shall provide a report to the President of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives on a biennial basis, beginning January 31, 2006, on the agency’s efforts to prevent, detect, and deter, as well as recover funds lost to, fraud and abuse in the Medicaid program.
(36) At least three times a year, the agency shall provide to each Medicaid recipient or his or her representative an explanation of benefits in the form of a letter that is mailed to the most recent address of the recipient on the record with the Department of Children and Family Services. The explanation of benefits must include the patient’s name, the name of the health care provider and the address of the location where the service was provided, a description of all services billed to Medicaid in terminology that should be understood by a reasonable person, and information on how to report inappropriate or incorrect billing to the agency or other law enforcement entities for review or investigation. At least once a year, the letter also must include information on how to report criminal Medicaid fraud, the Medicaid Fraud Control Unit’s toll-free hotline number, and information about the rewards available under s. 409.9203. The explanation of benefits may not be mailed for Medicaid independent laboratory services as described in s. 409.905(7) or for Medicaid certified match services as described in ss. 409.9071 and 1011.70.
(37) The agency shall post on its website a current list of each Medicaid provider, including any principal, officer, director, agent, managing employee, or affiliated person of the provider, or any partner or shareholder having an ownership interest in the provider equal to 5 percent or greater, who has been terminated for cause from the Medicaid program or sanctioned under this section. The list must be searchable by a variety of search parameters and provide for the creation of formatted lists that may be printed or imported into other applications, including spreadsheets. The agency shall update the list at least monthly.
(38) In order to improve the detection of health care fraud, use technology to prevent and detect fraud, and maximize the electronic exchange of health care fraud information, the agency shall:
(a) Compile, maintain, and publish on its website a detailed list of all state and federal databases that contain health care fraud information and update the list at least biannually;
(b) Develop a strategic plan to connect all databases that contain health care fraud information to facilitate the electronic exchange of health information between the agency, the Department of Health, the Department of Law Enforcement, and the Attorney General’s Office. The plan must include recommended standard data formats, fraud identification strategies, and specifications for the technical interface between state and federal health care fraud databases;
(c) Monitor innovations in health information technology, specifically as it pertains to Medicaid fraud prevention and detection; and
(d) Periodically publish policy briefs that highlight available new technology to prevent or detect health care fraud and projects implemented by other states, the private sector, or the Federal Government which use technology to prevent or detect health care fraud.