Writs of execution may be against the property of the judgment debtor, another against the person of the judgment debtor, and a third for the delivery of the possession of real or personal property, including damages for withholding the property. A writ of execution must require the officer or person to whom it is directed to proceed substantially as follows:

Terms Used In Alaska Statutes 09.35.030

  • Damages: Money paid by defendants to successful plaintiffs in civil cases to compensate the plaintiffs for their injuries.
  • person: includes a corporation, company, partnership, firm, association, organization, business trust, or society, as well as a natural person. See Alaska Statutes 01.10.060
  • personal property: includes money, goods, chattels, things in action, and evidences of debt. See Alaska Statutes 01.10.060
  • property: includes real and personal property. See Alaska Statutes 01.10.060
  • Real property: Land, and all immovable fixtures erected on, growing on, or affixed to the land.
  • Writ: A formal written command, issued from the court, requiring the performance of a specific act.

(1) if the writ is against the property of the judgment debtor and the judgment directs particular property to be sold, it shall require the officer or person to sell the particular property and apply the proceeds as directed by the judgment; otherwise, it shall require the officer or person to satisfy the judgment, with interest, out of the personal property of the debtor, and, if sufficient personal property cannot be found, then out of the real property belonging to the debtor on the day when the judgment became a lien or at any time after that day;

(2) if the writ is against real or personal property in the hands of the judgment debtor’s personal representatives, heirs, devisees, legatees, tenants, or trustees, it shall require the officer or person to satisfy the judgment, with interest, out of that property;

(3) if the writ is against the person of an absconding judgment debtor, it shall require the officer or person to arrest the debtor and commit the debtor to jail until the judgment is paid, with interest, or is discharged according to law; if the writ is against the person of any judgment debtor and the application for the writ is made under oath, upon probable cause, and describing the things to be seized as in a warrant, the officer may search and seize valuables from that debtor;

(4) if the writ is for the delivery of the possession of real or personal property, it shall require the officer or person to deliver the possession of the property, describing it, to the party entitled to it, and may at the same time require the officer or person to satisfy any costs, charges, damages, rents, or profits recovered by that judgment out of the personal property of the person against whom it was rendered, and the value of the property for which the judgment was recovered to be specified in the writ, if a delivery cannot be had; and, if sufficient personal property cannot be found, then out of the real property as provided in (1) of this section.