Before approving any plan for energy conservation and load management and clean energy projects issued to the Commissioner of Energy and Environmental Protection by the Energy Conservation and Management Board, the board of directors of the Connecticut Green Bank or an electric distribution company, said commissioner shall determine that an equitable amount of the funds administered by each such board are to be deployed among small and large customers with a maximum average monthly peak demand of one hundred kilowatts in census tracts in which the median income is not more than sixty per cent of the state median income. The Commissioner of Energy and Environmental Protection shall determine such equitable share and such projects may include a mentoring component for such communities. On and after January 1, 2012, and annually thereafter, the Commissioner of Energy and Environmental Protection shall report, in accordance with the provisions of section 11-4a, to the joint standing committee of the General Assembly having cognizance of matters relating to energy regarding the distribution of funds to such communities. Any such report may be submitted electronically.

Terms Used In Connecticut General Statutes 16-245ee

  • Commissioner of Energy and Environmental Protection: means the Commissioner of Energy and Environmental Protection appointed pursuant to title 4, or the commissioner's designee. See Connecticut General Statutes 16-1
  • distribution company: means any person providing electric transmission or distribution services within the state, but does not include: (A) A private power producer, as defined in section 16-243b. See Connecticut General Statutes 16-1
  • Equitable: Pertaining to civil suits in "equity" rather than in "law." In English legal history, the courts of "law" could order the payment of damages and could afford no other remedy. See damages. A separate court of "equity" could order someone to do something or to cease to do something. See, e.g., injunction. In American jurisprudence, the federal courts have both legal and equitable power, but the distinction is still an important one. For example, a trial by jury is normally available in "law" cases but not in "equity" cases. Source: U.S. Courts