§ 81 Zoning Board of Appeals
§ 81-A Board of Appeals Procedure
§ 81-B Permitted Action by Board of Appeals
§ 81-C Article Seventy-Eight Proceeding
§ 81-D Incentive Zoning; Definitions, Purposes, Conditions, Procedures
§ 81-E Article Not Applicable to Certain Cities
§ 81-F Planned Unit Development Zoning Districts
§ 83 Amendments, Alterations and Changes in District Lines
§ 83-A Exemption of Lots Shown On Approved Subdivision Plats

Terms Used In New York Laws > General City > Article 5-A - Buildings and Use Districts

  • Amendment: A proposal to alter the text of a pending bill or other measure by striking out some of it, by inserting new language, or both. Before an amendment becomes part of the measure, thelegislature must agree to it.
  • Answer: The formal written statement by a defendant responding to a civil complaint and setting forth the grounds for defense.
  • Appeal: A request made after a trial, asking another court (usually the court of appeals) to decide whether the trial was conducted properly. To make such a request is "to appeal" or "to take an appeal." One who appeals is called the appellant.
  • Appellate: About appeals; an appellate court has the power to review the judgement of another lower court or tribunal.
  • Equitable: Pertaining to civil suits in "equity" rather than in "law." In English legal history, the courts of "law" could order the payment of damages and could afford no other remedy. See damages. A separate court of "equity" could order someone to do something or to cease to do something. See, e.g., injunction. In American jurisprudence, the federal courts have both legal and equitable power, but the distinction is still an important one. For example, a trial by jury is normally available in "law" cases but not in "equity" cases. Source: U.S. Courts
  • Evidence: Information presented in testimony or in documents that is used to persuade the fact finder (judge or jury) to decide the case for one side or the other.
  • Judgement: The official decision of a court finally determining the respective rights and claims of the parties to a suit.
  • Settlement: Parties to a lawsuit resolve their difference without having a trial. Settlements often involve the payment of compensation by one party in satisfaction of the other party's claims.
  • Testimony: Evidence presented orally by witnesses during trials or before grand juries.