Within five business days after receipt of an application, the department shall transmit to the division two sets of fingerprints and the fees required pursuant to paragraph (b) of subdivision ten of section eighty-nine-h of this article. One set of fingerprints and the required fee shall be submitted to the federal bureau of investigation for a national criminal history record check. The results will be used to ascertain whether or not the applicant has been charged with or convicted of a serious offense and may cause to be conducted an investigation to verify the information contained in the application; provided, however, that the department shall cause such investigation to be conducted for applicants whose application has not been submitted and verified pursuant to section eighty-nine-g of this article. The department, in consultation with the division, may waive such background checks, investigations and fees if in its opinion, the security guard applicant has been subject to previous background checks and investigation requirements which meet or exceed the requirements of this section. The department, in consultation with the division, may not be required to conduct background checks or investigations for applicants who are also employed as peace officers.

Terms Used In N.Y. General Business Law 89-I

  • Applicant: shall mean an individual who has filed an application with the department for a security guard registration card. See N.Y. General Business Law 89-F
  • Department: shall mean the department of state. See N.Y. General Business Law 89-F
  • Division: shall mean the division of criminal justice services. See N.Y. General Business Law 89-F
  • Serious offense: shall mean any felony involving the offenses enumerated in the closing paragraph of this subdivision; a criminal solicitation of or a conspiracy to commit or an attempt to commit or a criminal facilitation of a felony involving the offenses enumerated in the closing paragraph of this subdivision, which criminal solicitation, conspiracy, attempt or criminal facilitation itself constitutes a felony or any offense in any other jurisdiction which if committed in this state would constitute a felony; any offense in any other jurisdiction which if committed in this state would constitute a felony provided that for the purposes of this article, none of the following shall be considered criminal convictions or reported as such: (i) a conviction for which an executive pardon has been issued pursuant to the executive law; (ii) a conviction which has been vacated and replaced by a youthful offender finding pursuant to article seven hundred twenty of the criminal procedure law, or the applicable provisions of law of any other jurisdiction; or (iii) a conviction the records of which have been sealed pursuant to the applicable provisions of the laws of this state or of any other jurisdiction; and (iv) a conviction for which other evidence of successful rehabilitation to remove the disability has been issued. See N.Y. General Business Law 89-F