The General Assembly hereby finds, determines, and declares:
         (1) It is in the public interest and it is the public
    
policy of this State to provide for and improve the basic medical care and long-term health care services of its indigent, most vulnerable citizens.
        (2) Preservation of health, alleviation of sickness,
    
and correction of disabling conditions for persons requiring maintenance support are essential if those persons are to have an opportunity to become self-supporting or to attain a greater capacity for self-care.
        (3) For persons who are medically indigent but
    
otherwise able to provide themselves a livelihood, it is of special importance to maintain their incentives for continued independence and preserve their limited resources for ordinary maintenance needed to prevent their total or substantial dependence on public support.
        (4) The State has historically provided for care and
    
services, in conjunction with the federal government, through the establishment and funding of a medical assistance program administered by the Department of Healthcare and Family Services (formerly Department of Public Aid) and approved by the Secretary of Health and Human Services under Title XIX of the federal Social Security Act, that program being commonly referred to as "Medicaid".
        (5) The Medicaid program is a funding partnership
    
between the State of Illinois and the federal government, with the Department of Healthcare and Family Services being designated as the single State agency responsible for the administration of the program, but with the State historically receiving 50% of the amounts expended as medical assistance under the Medicaid program from the federal government.
        (6) To raise a portion of Illinois' share of the
    
Medicaid funds after July 1, 1991, the General Assembly enacted Public Act 87-13 to provide for the collection of provider participation fees from designated health care providers receiving Medicaid payments.
        (7) On September 12, 1991, the Secretary of Health
    
and Human Services proposed regulations that could have reduced the federal matching of Medicaid expenditures incurred on or after January 1, 1992 by the portion of the expenditures paid from funds raised through the provider participation fees.
        (8) To prevent the Secretary from enacting those
    
regulations but at the same time to impose certain statutory limitations on the means by which states may raise Medicaid funds eligible for federal matching, Congress enacted the Medicaid Voluntary Contribution and Provider-Specific Tax Amendments of 1991, Public Law 102-234.
        (9) Public Law 102-234 provides for a state's share
    
of Medicaid funding eligible for federal matching to be raised through "broad-based health care related taxes", meaning, generally, a tax imposed with respect to a class of health care items or services (or providers thereof) specified therein, which (i) is imposed on all items or services or providers in the class in the state, except federal or public providers, and (ii) is imposed uniformly on all providers in the class at the same rate with respect to the same base.
        (10) The separate classes of health care items and
    
services established by P.L. 102-234 include inpatient and outpatient hospital services, nursing facility services, and services of intermediate care facilities for persons with intellectual disabilities.
        (11) The provider participation fees imposed under
    
P.A. 87-13 may not meet the standards under P.L. 102-234.
        (12) The resulting hospital Medicaid reimbursement
    
reductions may force the closure of some hospitals now serving a disproportionately high number of the needy, who would then have to be cared for by remaining hospitals at substantial cost to those remaining hospitals.
        (13) The hospitals in the State are all part of and
    
benefit from a hospital system linked together in a number of ways, including common licensing and regulation, health care standards, education, research and disease control reporting, patient transfers for specialist care, and organ donor networks.
        (14) Each hospital's patient population demographics,
    
including the proportion of patients whose care is paid by Medicaid, is subject to change over time.
        (15) Hospitals in the State have a special interest
    
in the payment of adequate reimbursement levels for hospital care by Medicaid.
        (16) Most hospitals are exempt from payment of most
    
federal, State, and local income, sales, property, and other taxes.
        (17) The hospital assessment enacted by this Act
    
under the guidelines of P.L. 102-234 is the most efficient means of raising the federally matchable funds needed for hospital care reimbursement.
        (18) Cook County Hospital and Oak Forest Hospital are
    
public hospitals owned and operated by Cook County with unique fiscal problems, including a patient population that is primarily Medicaid or altogether nonpaying, that make an intergovernmental transfer payment arrangement a more appropriate means of financing than the regular hospital assessment and reimbursement provisions.
        (19) Sole community hospitals provide access to
    
essential care that would otherwise not be reasonably available in the community they serve, such that imposition of assessments on them in their precarious financial circumstances may force their closure and have the effect of reducing access to health care.
        (20) Each nursing home's resident population
    
demographics, including the proportion of residents whose care is paid by Medicaid, is subject to change over time in that, among other things, residents currently able to pay the cost of nursing home care may become dependent on Medicaid support for continued care and services as resources are depleted.
        (21) As the citizens of the State age, increased
    
pressures will be placed on limited facilities to provide reasonable levels of care for a greater number of geriatric residents, and all involved in the nursing home industry, providers and residents, have a special interest in the maintenance of adequate Medicaid support for all nursing facilities.
        (22) The assessments on nursing homes enacted by this
    
Act under the guidelines of P.L. 102-234 are the most efficient means of raising the federally matchable funds needed for nursing home care reimbursement.
        (23) All intermediate care facilities for persons
    
with developmental disabilities receive a high degree of Medicaid support and benefits and therefore have a special interest in the maintenance of adequate Medicaid support.
        (24) The assessments on intermediate care facilities
    
for persons with developmental disabilities enacted by this Act under the guidelines of P.L. 102-234 are the most efficient means of raising the federally matchable funds needed for reimbursement of providers of intermediate care for persons with developmental disabilities.

Terms Used In Illinois Compiled Statutes 305 ILCS 35/1-2

  • Dependent: A person dependent for support upon another.
  • Donor: The person who makes a gift.
  • Public law: A public bill or joint resolution that has passed both chambers and been enacted into law. Public laws have general applicability nationwide.
  • State: when applied to different parts of the United States, may be construed to include the District of Columbia and the several territories, and the words "United States" may be construed to include the said district and territories. See Illinois Compiled Statutes 5 ILCS 70/1.14