As used in this chapter:

(1) “Arbitration” means a process whereby a neutral third person or panel, called an arbitrator or arbitration panel, considers the facts and arguments presented by the parties and renders a decision which may be binding or nonbinding as provided in this chapter.
(2) “Mediation” means a process whereby a neutral third person called a mediator acts to encourage and facilitate the resolution of a dispute between two or more parties. It is an informal and nonadversarial process with the objective of helping the disputing parties reach a mutually acceptable and voluntary agreement. In mediation, decisionmaking authority rests with the parties. The role of the mediator includes, but is not limited to, assisting the parties in identifying issues, fostering joint problem solving, and exploring settlement alternatives. “Mediation” includes:

(a) “Appellate court mediation,” which means mediation that occurs during the pendency of an appeal of a civil case.

Terms Used In Florida Statutes 44.1011

  • Appeal: A request made after a trial, asking another court (usually the court of appeals) to decide whether the trial was conducted properly. To make such a request is "to appeal" or "to take an appeal." One who appeals is called the appellant.
  • Arbitration: means a process whereby a neutral third person or panel, called an arbitrator or arbitration panel, considers the facts and arguments presented by the parties and renders a decision which may be binding or nonbinding as provided in this chapter. See Florida Statutes 44.1011
  • County court mediation: which means mediation of civil cases within the jurisdiction of county courts, including small claims. See Florida Statutes 44.1011
  • Dependency or in need of services mediation: which means mediation of dependency, child in need of services, or family in need of services matters. See Florida Statutes 44.1011
  • Family mediation: which means mediation of family matters, including married and unmarried persons, before and after judgments involving dissolution of marriage; property division; shared or sole parental responsibility; or child support, custody, and visitation involving emotional or financial considerations not usually present in other circuit civil cases. See Florida Statutes 44.1011
  • Jurisdiction: (1) The legal authority of a court to hear and decide a case. Concurrent jurisdiction exists when two courts have simultaneous responsibility for the same case. (2) The geographic area over which the court has authority to decide cases.
  • Mediation: includes :
    (a) "Appellate court mediation" which means mediation that occurs during the pendency of an appeal of a civil case. See Florida Statutes 44.1011
  • person: includes individuals, children, firms, associations, joint adventures, partnerships, estates, trusts, business trusts, syndicates, fiduciaries, corporations, and all other groups or combinations. See Florida Statutes 1.01
  • Settlement: Parties to a lawsuit resolve their difference without having a trial. Settlements often involve the payment of compensation by one party in satisfaction of the other party's claims.
(b) “Circuit court mediation,” which means mediation of civil cases, other than family matters, in circuit court. If a party is represented by counsel, the counsel of record must appear unless stipulated to by the parties or otherwise ordered by the court.
(c) “County court mediation,” which means mediation of civil cases within the jurisdiction of county courts, including small claims. Negotiations in county court mediation are primarily conducted by the parties. Counsel for each party may participate. However, presence of counsel is not required.
(d) “Family mediation” which means mediation of family matters, including married and unmarried persons, before and after judgments involving dissolution of marriage; property division; shared or sole parental responsibility; or child support, custody, and visitation involving emotional or financial considerations not usually present in other circuit civil cases. Negotiations in family mediation are primarily conducted by the parties. Counsel for each party may attend the mediation conference and privately communicate with their clients. However, presence of counsel is not required, and, in the discretion of the mediator, and with the agreement of the parties, mediation may proceed in the absence of counsel unless otherwise ordered by the court.
(e) “Dependency or in need of services mediation,” which means mediation of dependency, child in need of services, or family in need of services matters. Negotiations in dependency or in need of services mediation are primarily conducted by the parties. Counsel for each party may attend the mediation conference and privately communicate with their clients. However, presence of counsel is not required and, in the discretion of the mediator and with the agreement of the parties, mediation may proceed in the absence of counsel unless otherwise ordered by the court.