Terms Used In Florida Statutes 489.529

All residential or commercial intrusion/burglary alarms that have central monitoring must have a central monitoring verification call made to a telephone number associated with the premises generating the alarm signal, before alarm monitor personnel 1contact a law enforcement agency for alarm dispatch. The central monitoring station must employ call-verification methods for the premises generating the alarm signal if the first call is not answered. However, verification calling is not required if:

(1) The intrusion/burglary alarm has a properly operating visual or auditory sensor that enables the monitoring personnel to verify the alarm signal; or
(2) The intrusion/burglary alarm is installed on a premises that is used for the storage of firearms or ammunition by a person who holds a valid federal firearms license as a manufacturer, importer, or dealer of firearms or ammunition, provided the customer notifies the alarm monitoring company that he or she holds such license and would like to bypass the two-call verification protocol. Upon initiation of a new alarm monitoring service contract, the alarm monitoring company shall make reasonable efforts to inform a customer who holds a valid federal firearms license as a manufacturer, importer, or dealer of firearms or ammunition of his or her right to opt out of the two-call verification protocol.