§ 1 Superior Court; criminal jurisdiction
§ 3 Offenses near county line or in 2 counties
§ 4 County lines terminating at or near tidewaters; course
§ 5 Warrants for offenses at or near tidewaters; authority of officers
§ 6 Acquittal in part; conviction in part
§ 7 Removal of persons charged with crime in 2 counties
§ 8 Duties of officer holding prisoner or holding court’s order of removal

Terms Used In Maine Revised Statutes > Title 15 > Part 1 > Chapter 1 - Jurisdiction and Venue

  • Acquired brain injury: means an insult to the brain resulting directly or indirectly from trauma, anoxia, vascular lesions or infection, which:  
A. See Maine Revised Statutes Title 22 Sec. 3086
  • Adult: means a person who has attained the age of 18 years. See Maine Revised Statutes Title 1 Sec. 72
  • Appeal: A request made after a trial, asking another court (usually the court of appeals) to decide whether the trial was conducted properly. To make such a request is "to appeal" or "to take an appeal." One who appeals is called the appellant.
  • Appellate: About appeals; an appellate court has the power to review the judgement of another lower court or tribunal.
  • Arrest: Taking physical custody of a person by lawful authority.
  • Commissioner: means the Commissioner of Health and Human Services. See Maine Revised Statutes Title 22 Sec. 1-A
  • Complaint: A written statement by the plaintiff stating the wrongs allegedly committed by the defendant.
  • Conviction: A judgement of guilt against a criminal defendant.
  • Decedent: A deceased person.
  • Deed: The legal instrument used to transfer title in real property from one person to another.
  • Defendant: In a civil suit, the person complained against; in a criminal case, the person accused of the crime.
  • Dependent: A person dependent for support upon another.
  • Equitable: Pertaining to civil suits in "equity" rather than in "law." In English legal history, the courts of "law" could order the payment of damages and could afford no other remedy. See damages. A separate court of "equity" could order someone to do something or to cease to do something. See, e.g., injunction. In American jurisprudence, the federal courts have both legal and equitable power, but the distinction is still an important one. For example, a trial by jury is normally available in "law" cases but not in "equity" cases. Source: U.S. Courts
  • Evidence: Information presented in testimony or in documents that is used to persuade the fact finder (judge or jury) to decide the case for one side or the other.
  • Felony: A crime carrying a penalty of more than a year in prison.
  • Fraud: Intentional deception resulting in injury to another.
  • Guardian: A person legally empowered and charged with the duty of taking care of and managing the property of another person who because of age, intellect, or health, is incapable of managing his (her) own affairs.
  • Indictment: The formal charge issued by a grand jury stating that there is enough evidence that the defendant committed the crime to justify having a trial; it is used primarily for felonies.
  • Intestate: Dying without leaving a will.
  • Month: means a calendar month. See Maine Revised Statutes Title 1 Sec. 72
  • Partnership: A voluntary contract between two or more persons to pool some or all of their assets into a business, with the agreement that there will be a proportional sharing of profits and losses.
  • Probation: A sentencing alternative to imprisonment in which the court releases convicted defendants under supervision as long as certain conditions are observed.
  • Statute: A law passed by a legislature.
  • Testator: A male person who leaves a will at death.
  • Trial: A hearing that takes place when the defendant pleads "not guilty" and witnesses are required to come to court to give evidence.
  • Verdict: The decision of a petit jury or a judge.