(a) In addition to all other limitations and requirements, a condemning authority may not take or damage property by the exercise of the power of eminent domain unless it is for a public use, as set forth in this Section.
     (a-5) Subsections (b), (c), (d), (e), and (f) of this Section do not apply to the acquisition of property under the O’Hare Modernization Act. A condemning authority may exercise the power of eminent domain for the acquisition or damaging of property under the O’Hare Modernization Act as provided for by law in effect prior to the effective date of this Act.

Terms Used In Illinois Compiled Statutes 735 ILCS 30/5-5-5

  • Complaint: A written statement by the plaintiff stating the wrongs allegedly committed by the defendant.
  • Deed: The legal instrument used to transfer title in real property from one person to another.
  • Evidence: Information presented in testimony or in documents that is used to persuade the fact finder (judge or jury) to decide the case for one side or the other.
  • Lease: A contract transferring the use of property or occupancy of land, space, structures, or equipment in consideration of a payment (e.g., rent). Source: OCC
  • State: when applied to different parts of the United States, may be construed to include the District of Columbia and the several territories, and the words "United States" may be construed to include the said district and territories. See Illinois Compiled Statutes 5 ILCS 70/1.14
  • Statute: A law passed by a legislature.

     (a-10) Subsections (b), (c), (d), (e), and (f) of this Section do not apply to the acquisition or damaging of property in furtherance of the goals and objectives of an existing tax increment allocation redevelopment plan. A condemning authority may exercise the power of eminent domain for the acquisition of property in furtherance of an existing tax increment allocation redevelopment plan as provided for by law in effect prior to the effective date of this Act.
     As used in this subsection, “existing tax increment allocation redevelopment plan” means a redevelopment plan that was adopted under the Tax Increment Allocation Redevelopment Act (Article 11, Division 74.4 of the Illinois Municipal Code) prior to April 15, 2006 and for which property assembly costs were, before that date, included as a budget line item in the plan or described in the narrative portion of the plan as part of the redevelopment project, but does not include (i) any additional area added to the redevelopment project area on or after April 15, 2006, (ii) any subsequent extension of the completion date of a redevelopment plan beyond the estimated completion date established in that plan prior to April 15, 2006, (iii) any acquisition of property in a conservation area for which the condemnation complaint is filed more than 12 years after the effective date of this Act, or (iv) any acquisition of property in an industrial park conservation area.
     As used in this subsection, “conservation area” and “industrial park conservation area” have the same meanings as under Section 11-74.4-3 of the Illinois Municipal Code.
     (b) If the exercise of eminent domain authority is to acquire property for public ownership and control, then the condemning authority must prove that (i) the acquisition of the property is necessary for a public purpose and (ii) the acquired property will be owned and controlled by the condemning authority or another governmental entity.
     (c) Except when the acquisition is governed by subsection (b) or is primarily for one of the purposes specified in subsection (d), (e), or (f) and the condemning authority elects to proceed under one of those subsections, if the exercise of eminent domain authority is to acquire property for private ownership or control, or both, then the condemning authority must prove by clear and convincing evidence that the acquisition of the property for private ownership or control is (i) primarily for the benefit, use, or enjoyment of the public and (ii) necessary for a public purpose.
     An acquisition of property primarily for the purpose of the elimination of blight is rebuttably presumed to be for a public purpose and primarily for the benefit, use, or enjoyment of the public under this subsection.
     Any challenge to the existence of blighting factors alleged in a complaint to condemn under this subsection shall be raised within 6 months of the filing date of the complaint to condemn, and if not raised within that time the right to challenge the existence of those blighting factors shall be deemed waived.
     Evidence that the Illinois Commerce Commission has granted a certificate or otherwise made a finding of public convenience and necessity for an acquisition of property (or any right or interest in property) for private ownership or control (including, without limitation, an acquisition for which the use of eminent domain is authorized under the Public Utilities Act, the Telephone Company Act, or the Electric Supplier Act) to be used for utility purposes creates a rebuttable presumption that such acquisition of that property (or right or interest in property) is (i) primarily for the benefit, use, or enjoyment of the public and (ii) necessary for a public purpose.
     In the case of an acquisition of property (or any right or interest in property) for private ownership or control to be used for utility, pipeline, or railroad purposes for which no certificate or finding of public convenience and necessity by the Illinois Commerce Commission is required, evidence that the acquisition is one for which the use of eminent domain is authorized under one of the following laws creates a rebuttable presumption that the acquisition of that property (or right or interest in property) is (i) primarily for the benefit, use, or enjoyment of the public and (ii) necessary for a public purpose:
         (1) the Public Utilities Act,
         (2) the Telephone Company Act,
         (3) the Electric Supplier Act,
         (4) the Railroad Terminal Authority Act,
         (5) the Grand Avenue Railroad Relocation Authority
    
Act,
        (6) the West Cook Railroad Relocation and Development
    
Authority Act,
        (7) Section 4-505 of the Illinois Highway Code,
         (8) Section 17 or 18 of the Railroad Incorporation
    
Act,
        (9) Section 18c-7501 of the Illinois Vehicle Code.
     (d) If the exercise of eminent domain authority is to acquire property for private ownership or control and if the primary basis for the acquisition is the elimination of blight and the condemning authority elects to proceed under this subsection, then the condemning authority must: (i) prove by a preponderance of the evidence that acquisition of the property for private ownership or control is necessary for a public purpose; (ii) prove by a preponderance of the evidence that the property to be acquired is located in an area that is currently designated as a blighted area or conservation area under an applicable statute; (iii) if the existence of blight or blighting factors is challenged in an appropriate motion filed within 6 months after the date of filing of the complaint to condemn, prove by a preponderance of the evidence that the required blighting factors existed in the area so designated (but not necessarily in the particular property to be acquired) at the time of the designation under item (ii) or at any time thereafter; and (iv) prove by a preponderance of the evidence at least one of the following:
         (A) that it has entered into an express written
    
agreement in which a private person or entity agrees to undertake a development project within the blighted area that specifically details the reasons for which the property or rights in that property are necessary for the development project;
        (B) that the exercise of eminent domain power and the
    
proposed use of the property by the condemning authority are consistent with a regional plan that has been adopted within the past 5 years in accordance with Section 5-14001 of the Counties Code or Section 11-12-6 of the Illinois Municipal Code or with a local land resource management plan adopted under Section 4 of the Local Land Resource Management Planning Act; or
        (C) that (1) the acquired property will be used in
    
the development of a project that is consistent with the land uses set forth in a comprehensive redevelopment plan prepared in accordance with the applicable statute authorizing the condemning authority to exercise the power of eminent domain and is consistent with the goals and purposes of that comprehensive redevelopment plan, and (2) an enforceable written agreement, deed restriction, or similar encumbrance has been or will be executed and recorded against the acquired property to assure that the project and the use of the property remain consistent with those land uses, goals, and purposes for a period of at least 40 years, which execution and recording shall be included as a requirement in any final order entered in the condemnation proceeding.
    The existence of an ordinance, resolution, or other official act designating an area as blighted is not prima facie evidence of the existence of blight. A finding by the court in a condemnation proceeding that a property or area has not been proven to be blighted does not apply to any other case or undermine the designation of a blighted area or conservation area or the determination of the existence of blight for any other purpose or under any other statute, including without limitation under the Tax Increment Allocation Redevelopment Act (Article 11, Division 74.4 of the Illinois Municipal Code).
     Any challenge to the existence of blighting factors alleged in a complaint to condemn under this subsection shall be raised within 6 months of the filing date of the complaint to condemn, and if not raised within that time the right to challenge the existence of those blighting factors shall be deemed waived.
     (e) If the exercise of eminent domain authority is to acquire property for private ownership or control and if the primary purpose of the acquisition is one of the purposes specified in item (iii) of this subsection and the condemning authority elects to proceed under this subsection, then the condemning authority must prove by a preponderance of the evidence that: (i) the acquisition of the property is necessary for a public purpose; (ii) an enforceable written agreement, deed restriction, or similar encumbrance has been or will be executed and recorded against the acquired property to assure that the project and the use of the property remain consistent with the applicable purpose specified in item (iii) of this subsection for a period of at least 40 years, which execution and recording shall be included as a requirement in any final order entered in the condemnation proceeding; and (iii) the acquired property will be one of the following:
         (1) included in the project site for a residential
    
project, or a mixed-use project including residential units, where not less than 20% of the residential units in the project are made available, for at least 15 years, by deed restriction, long-term lease, regulatory agreement, extended use agreement, or a comparable recorded encumbrance, to low-income households and very low-income households, as defined in Section 3 of the Illinois Affordable Housing Act;
        (2) used primarily for public airport, road, parking,
    
or mass transportation purposes and sold or leased to a private party in a sale-leaseback, lease-leaseback, or similar structured financing;
        (3) owned or used by a public utility or electric
    
cooperative for utility purposes;
        (4) owned or used by a railroad for passenger or
    
freight transportation purposes;
        (5) sold or leased to a private party that operates a
    
water supply, waste water, recycling, waste disposal, waste-to-energy, or similar facility;
        (6) sold or leased to a not-for-profit corporation
    
whose purposes include the preservation of open space, the operation of park space, and similar public purposes;
        (7) used as a library, museum, or related facility,
    
or as infrastructure related to such a facility;
        (8) used by a private party for the operation of a
    
charter school open to the general public; or
        (9) a historic resource, as defined in Section 3 of
    
the Illinois State Agency Historic Resources Preservation Act, a landmark designated as such under a local ordinance, or a contributing structure within a local landmark district listed on the National Register of Historic Places, that is being acquired for purposes of preservation or rehabilitation.
    (f) If the exercise of eminent domain authority is to acquire property for public ownership and private control and if the primary purpose of the acquisition is one of the purposes specified in item (iii) of this subsection and the condemning authority elects to proceed under this subsection, then the condemning authority must prove by a preponderance of the evidence that: (i) the acquisition of the property is necessary for a public purpose; (ii) the acquired property will be owned by the condemning authority or another governmental entity; and (iii) the acquired property will be controlled by a private party that operates a business or facility related to the condemning authority's operation of a university, medical district, hospital, exposition or convention center, mass transportation facility, or airport, including, but not limited to, a medical clinic, research and development center, food or commercial concession facility, social service facility, maintenance or storage facility, cargo facility, rental car facility, bus facility, taxi facility, flight kitchen, fixed based operation, parking facility, refueling facility, water supply facility, and railroad tracks and stations.
     (g) This Article is a limitation on the exercise of the power of eminent domain, but is not an independent grant of authority to exercise the power of eminent domain.