(a) The Appellate Court shall consist of nine judges, except as provided in subsection (b) of this section, who shall also be judges of the Superior Court, and who shall be appointed by the General Assembly, upon nomination of the Governor for a term of eight years. The judges shall sit in panels of three, or en banc, pursuant to rules adopted by the Appellate Court. The Chief Justice shall designate one of these judges as Chief Judge of the Appellate Court.

Terms Used In Connecticut General Statutes 51-197c

  • Appeal: A request made after a trial, asking another court (usually the court of appeals) to decide whether the trial was conducted properly. To make such a request is "to appeal" or "to take an appeal." One who appeals is called the appellant.
  • Appellate: About appeals; an appellate court has the power to review the judgement of another lower court or tribunal.
  • Chief judge: The judge who has primary responsibility for the administration of a court but also decides cases; chief judges are determined by seniority.
  • En banc: In the bench or "full bench." Refers to court sessions with the entire membership of a court participating rather than the usual quorum. U.S. courts of appeals usually sit in panels of three judges, but may expand to a larger number in certain cases. They are then said to be sitting en banc.
  • Remainder: An interest in property that takes effect in the future at a specified time or after the occurrence of some event, such as the death of a life tenant.

(b) If a judge of the Appellate Court (1) is appointed the Chief Court Administrator, or (2) on July 1, 2001, is serving as the Chief Court Administrator, the Appellate Court shall consist of ten judges for the remainder of said judge’s current term on the Appellate Court, or until his or her retirement from full-time active service, whichever occurs first. The tenth judge shall also be a judge of the Superior Court and shall be appointed by the General Assembly upon nomination of the Governor for a term of eight years.

(c) With the approval of the Chief Justice, the Chief Judge shall (1) schedule such sessions as may be necessary, at such locations as the facilitation of court business requires, (2) designate as many panels as may be necessary, each consisting of three judges assigned by the Chief Judge, and (3) designate a presiding judge for each panel on which the Chief Judge does not sit.

(d) Every judge of the Superior Court shall, by virtue of appointment to the Superior Court, be qualified to serve as a judge on the Appellate Court.

(e) Each of the parties in any case shall have a right to be heard by a full panel. The Chief Judge, with the approval of the Chief Justice, may summon one or more of the judges of the Superior Court to constitute a full panel.

(f) The judges of the Appellate Court shall be released from sitting on the Superior Court, except that the Chief Justice may assign any such judge to sit on the Superior Court whenever in the Chief Justice’s judgment the public business may require it.

(g) If the Chief Court Administrator is a judge of the Appellate Court, said Chief Court Administrator shall be released from sitting on the Appellate Court, except that the Chief Justice may assign the Chief Court Administrator to sit on the Appellate Court whenever, in the Chief Justice’s judgment, the public business may require it.

(h) Each Chief Judge or judge of the Appellate Court who elects to retain such judge’s office but to retire from full-time active service shall continue to be a member of the Appellate Court during the remainder of such judge’s term of office and during the term of any reappointment under section 51-50i, until such judge attains the age of seventy years. Such judge shall be entitled to participate in the meetings of the judges of the Appellate Court and to vote as a member thereof.

(i) In each appeal to the Appellate Court, the party appealing shall pay a record fee as prescribed in section 52-259, at such time as is fixed by rule of court, which amount shall be taxed in favor of the appellant if judgment is finally rendered in such appellant’s favor.