(1) Every defendant who is charged with a felony and who is adjudicated incompetent to proceed may be involuntarily committed for treatment upon a finding by the court of clear and convincing evidence that:

(a) The defendant has a mental illness and because of the mental illness:

1. The defendant is manifestly incapable of surviving alone or with the help of willing and responsible family or friends, including available alternative services, and, without treatment, the defendant is likely to suffer from neglect or refuse to care for herself or himself and such neglect or refusal poses a real and present threat of substantial harm to the defendant’s well-being; or
2. There is a substantial likelihood that in the near future the defendant will inflict serious bodily harm on herself or himself or another person, as evidenced by recent behavior causing, attempting, or threatening such harm;

Terms Used In Florida Statutes 916.13

  • Defendant: In a civil suit, the person complained against; in a criminal case, the person accused of the crime.
  • Evidence: Information presented in testimony or in documents that is used to persuade the fact finder (judge or jury) to decide the case for one side or the other.
  • Felony: A crime carrying a penalty of more than a year in prison.
  • Jurisdiction: (1) The legal authority of a court to hear and decide a case. Concurrent jurisdiction exists when two courts have simultaneous responsibility for the same case. (2) The geographic area over which the court has authority to decide cases.
  • person: includes individuals, children, firms, associations, joint adventures, partnerships, estates, trusts, business trusts, syndicates, fiduciaries, corporations, and all other groups or combinations. See Florida Statutes 1.01
(b) All available, less restrictive treatment alternatives, including treatment in community residential facilities or community inpatient or outpatient settings, which would offer an opportunity for improvement of the defendant’s condition have been judged to be inappropriate; and
(c) There is a substantial probability that the mental illness causing the defendant’s incompetence will respond to treatment and the defendant will regain competency to proceed in the reasonably foreseeable future.
(2) A defendant who has been charged with a felony and who has been adjudicated incompetent to proceed due to mental illness, and who meets the criteria for involuntary commitment under this chapter, may be committed to the department, and the department shall retain and treat the defendant.

(a) Immediately after receipt of a completed copy of the court commitment order containing all documentation required by the applicable Florida Rules of Criminal Procedure, the department shall request all medical information relating to the defendant from the jail. The jail shall provide the department with all medical information relating to the defendant within 3 business days after receipt of the department’s request or at the time the defendant enters the physical custody of the department, whichever is earlier.
(b) Within 6 months after the date of admission and at the end of any period of extended commitment, or at any time the administrator or his or her designee determines that the defendant has regained competency to proceed or no longer meets the criteria for continued commitment, the administrator or designee shall file a report with the court pursuant to the applicable Florida Rules of Criminal Procedure.
(c) A competency hearing must be held within 30 days after the court receives notification that the defendant is competent to proceed or no longer meets the criteria for continued commitment. The defendant must be transported to the committing court’s jurisdiction for the hearing. If the defendant is receiving psychotropic medication at a mental health facility at the time he or she is discharged and transferred to the jail, the administering of such medication must continue unless the jail physician documents the need to change or discontinue it. The jail and department physicians shall collaborate to ensure that medication changes do not adversely affect the defendant’s mental health status or his or her ability to continue with court proceedings; however, the final authority regarding the administering of medication to an inmate in jail rests with the jail physician.