§ 185 Short Title; Purpose of Article
§ 186 Definitions
§ 187 Local Option
§ 188 Local Laws and Ordinances
§ 188-A Powers and Duties of the Board
§ 189 Restrictions Upon Conduct of Games of Chance
§ 189-A Authorized Supplier of Games of Chance Equipment
§ 189-B Declaration of State’S Exemption From Operation of Provisions of 15 U.S.C. (1172)
§ 189-C Legal Shipments of Gaming Devices Into New York State
§ 190 Application for License
§ 190-A Raffles; License Not Required
§ 191 Investigation; Matters to Be Determined; Issuance of License; Fees; Duration of License
§ 192 Hearing; Amendment of License
§ 193 Form and Contents of License; Display of License
§ 194 Control and Supervision; Suspension of Identification Numbers and Licenses; Inspection of Premises
§ 195 Sunday; Conduct of Games On
§ 195-A Participation by Persons Under Eighteen
§ 195-B Frequency of Games
§ 195-C Persons Operating Games; Equipment; Expenses; Compensation
§ 195-D Charge for Admission and Participation; Amount of Prizes; Award of Prizes
§ 195-E Advertising Games
§ 195-F Statement of Receipts, Expenses; Additional License Fees
§ 195-G Examination of Books and Records; Examination of Officers and Employees; Disclosure of Information
§ 195-H Appeals From the Decision of an Officer, Clerk or Department to Board
§ 195-I Exemption From Prosecution
§ 195-J Offenses; Forfeiture of License; Ineligibility to Apply for License
§ 195-K Unlawful Games of Chance
§ 195-L Article Inoperative Until Adopted by Voters
§ 195-M Amendment and Repeal of Local Laws and Ordinances
§ 195-N Manufacturers of Bell Jars; Reports and Records
§ 195-O Distributor of Bell Jars; Reports and Records
§ 195-P Transfer Restrictions
§ 195-Q Bell Jar Compliance and Enforcement
§ 195-R Severability

Terms Used In New York Laws > General Municipal > Article 9-A

  • Appeal: A request made after a trial, asking another court (usually the court of appeals) to decide whether the trial was conducted properly. To make such a request is "to appeal" or "to take an appeal." One who appeals is called the appellant.
  • Authorized games of chance lessor: shall mean an authorized organization which has been granted a lessor's license pursuant to the provisions of this article or a municipality. See N.Y. General Municipal Law 186
  • Authorized organization: shall mean and include any bona fide religious or charitable organization or bona fide educational, fraternal or service organization or bona fide organization of veterans or volunteer firefighters, which by its charter, certificate of incorporation, constitution, or act of the legislature, shall have among its dominant purposes one or more of the lawful purposes as defined in this article, provided that each shall operate without profit to its members, and provided that each such organization has engaged in serving one or more of the lawful purposes as defined in this article for a

    period of three years immediately prior to applying for a license under this article. See N.Y. General Municipal Law 186

  • Bell jars: shall mean and include those games in which a participant shall draw a card from a jar, vending machine, or other suitable device or container which contains numbers, colors or symbols that are covered and which, when uncovered, may reveal that a prize shall be awarded on the basis of a designated winning number, color or symbol or combination of numbers, colors or symbols. See N.Y. General Municipal Law 186
  • Board: shall mean New York state gaming commission created pursuant to section one hundred two of the racing, pari-mutuel wagering and breeding law. See N.Y. General Municipal Law 186
  • Chairman: means the chairman of the dormitory authority. See N.Y. Public Authorities Law 1695
  • Clerk: shall mean the clerk of a municipality outside the city of New York. See N.Y. General Municipal Law 186
  • Contemplation of death: The expectation of death that provides the primary motive to make a gift.
  • Department: shall mean the New York City Department of Consumer Affairs. See N.Y. General Municipal Law 186
  • Equitable: Pertaining to civil suits in "equity" rather than in "law." In English legal history, the courts of "law" could order the payment of damages and could afford no other remedy. See damages. A separate court of "equity" could order someone to do something or to cease to do something. See, e.g., injunction. In American jurisprudence, the federal courts have both legal and equitable power, but the distinction is still an important one. For example, a trial by jury is normally available in "law" cases but not in "equity" cases. Source: U.S. Courts
  • Event game: shall mean a bell jar game in which certain winners are determined by the random selection of one or more bingo numbers, the use of a seal card or by another method approved by the board. See N.Y. General Municipal Law 186
  • Fair market value: The price at which an asset would change hands in a transaction between a willing, informed buyer and a willing, informed seller.
  • Felony: A crime carrying a penalty of more than a year in prison.
  • Flare: shall mean a poster description of the bell jar game, which shall include a declaration of the number of winners and amount of prizes in each deal, the number of prizes available in the deal, the number of tickets in each deal which contain the stated prize; the manufacturer's game form number, and the serial number of the deal which shall be identical to the serial number imprinted on each ticket contained in the deal. See N.Y. General Municipal Law 186
  • Games of chance: shall mean and include only the games known as "merchandise wheels" "coin boards" "merchandise boards" "seal cards" "event games" "raffles" and "bell jars" and such other specific games as may be authorized by the board, in which prizes are awarded on the basis of a designated winning number or numbers, color or colors, symbol or symbols determined by chance, but not including games commonly known as "bingo or lotto" which are controlled under article fourteen-H of this chapter and also not including "bookmaking" "policy or numbers games" and "lottery" as defined in section 225. See N.Y. General Municipal Law 186
  • Lawful purposes: shall mean one or more of the following causes, deeds or activities:

    (a) Those which shall benefit needy or deserving persons indefinite in number by enhancing their opportunity for religious or educational advancement, by relieving them from disease, suffering or distress, or by contributing to their physical wellbeing, by assisting them in establishing themselves in life as worthy and useful citizens, or by increasing their comprehension of and devotion to the principles upon which this nation was founded and enhancing their loyalty to their governments. See N.Y. General Municipal Law 186

  • Legal tender: coins, dollar bills, or other currency issued by a government as official money. Source: U.S. Mint
  • Liabilities: The aggregate of all debts and other legal obligations of a particular person or legal entity.
  • License period: shall mean a period of time not to exceed fourteen consecutive hours and, for purposes of the game of chance known as a bell jar and a raffle, "license period" shall mean a period of time running from January first to December thirty-first of each year. See N.Y. General Municipal Law 186
  • merchandise board: shall mean a board used in conjunction with bell jar tickets which contains and displays various coins and/or merchandise as prizes. See N.Y. General Municipal Law 186
  • Municipality: shall mean any city, town or village within this state. See N.Y. General Municipal Law 186
  • Net proceeds: shall mean (a) in relation to the gross receipts from one or more license periods of games of chance, the amount that shall remain after deducting the reasonable sums necessarily and actually

    expended

    for

    supplies

    and

    equipment,

    prizes, security-personnel, stated rental if any, bookkeeping or accounting services according to a schedule of compensation prescribed by the board, janitorial services and utility supplies if any, license fees, and the cost of bus transportation, if authorized by the clerk or department and (b) in relation to the gross rent received by an authorized games of chance lessor for the use of its premises by a game of chance licensee, the amount that shall remain after deducting the reasonable sums necessarily and actually expended for janitorial services and utility supplies directly attributable thereto if any. See N.Y. General Municipal Law 186

  • Obligation: An order placed, contract awarded, service received, or similar transaction during a given period that will require payments during the same or a future period.
  • Officer: shall mean the chief law enforcement officer of a municipality outside the city of New York, or if such municipality exercises the option set forth in subdivision two of section one hundred ninety-four of this article, the chief law enforcement officer of the county. See N.Y. General Municipal Law 186
  • One occasion: shall mean the successive operations of any one single type of game of chance which results in the awarding of a series of prizes amounting to five hundred dollars or four hundred dollars during any one license period, in accordance with the provisions of subdivision eight of section one hundred eighty-nine of this article, as the case may be. See N.Y. General Municipal Law 186
  • Operation: shall mean the play of a single type of game of chance necessary to determine the outcome or winners each time wagers are made. See N.Y. General Municipal Law 186
  • Precedent: A court decision in an earlier case with facts and law similar to a dispute currently before a court. Precedent will ordinarily govern the decision of a later similar case, unless a party can show that it was wrongly decided or that it differed in some significant way.
  • Premises: shall mean a designated area within a building, hall, tent, or grounds reasonably identified for the conduct of games of chance. See N.Y. General Municipal Law 186
  • Presiding officer: A majority-party Senator who presides over the Senate and is charged with maintaining order and decorum, recognizing Members to speak, and interpreting the Senate's rules, practices and precedents.
  • Prosecute: To charge someone with a crime. A prosecutor tries a criminal case on behalf of the government.
  • Raffle: shall mean and include those games of chance in which a participant pays money in return for a ticket or other receipt and in which a prize is awarded on the basis of a winning number or numbers, color or colors, or symbol or symbols designated on the ticket or receipt, determined by chance as a result of:

    (a) a drawing from among those tickets or receipts previously sold; or

    (b) a random event, the results of which correspond with tickets or receipts previously sold. See N.Y. General Municipal Law 186

  • Seal cards: shall mean a board or placard used in conjunction with a deal of the same serial number which contains one or more concealed areas that, when removed or opened, reveal a predesignated winning number, letter, or symbol located on the board or placard. See N.Y. General Municipal Law 186
  • Series of prizes: shall mean the total amount of single prizes minus the total amount of wagers lost during the successive operations of a single type of game of chance, except that for merchandise wheels and raffles, "series of prizes" shall mean the sum of cash and the fair market value of merchandise awarded as single prizes during the successive operations of any single merchandise wheel or raffle. See N.Y. General Municipal Law 186
  • Single prize: shall mean the sum of money or fair market value of merchandise or coins awarded to a participant by a games of chance licensee in any one operation of a single type of game of chance in excess of his wager. See N.Y. General Municipal Law 186
  • Single type of game: shall mean the games of chance known as merchandise wheels, coin boards, merchandise boards, event games, raffles, and bell jars and each other specific game of chance authorized by the board. See N.Y. General Municipal Law 186
  • Veto: The procedure established under the Constitution by which the President/Governor refuses to approve a bill or joint resolution and thus prevents its enactment into law. A regular veto occurs when the President/Governor returns the legislation to the house in which it originated. The President/Governor usually returns a vetoed bill with a message indicating his reasons for rejecting the measure. In Congress, the veto can be overridden only by a two-thirds vote in both the Senate and the House.