§ 4701 Establishment of Farm Schools
§ 4702 Acquisition of Lands and Erection of Buildings
§ 4703 Board of Managers
§ 4704 Powers and Duties of Board
§ 4705 Powers of Superintendent; Discipline of School
§ 4706 Course of Instruction
§ 4707 Children Admitted to Such School
§ 4708 State Aid
§ 4709 Agreements With Parents and Guardians to Pay Expense of Maintenance; Compulsory Support
§ 4710 Maintenance by County
§ 4711 Reports to Board of Supervisors; Inspection
§ 4712 Powers of Commissioner of Education and Education Department

Terms Used In New York Laws > Education > Title 6 > Article 95

  • Acquittal:
    1. Judgement that a criminal defendant has not been proved guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.
    2. A verdict of "not guilty."
     
  • Affirmed: In the practice of the appellate courts, the decree or order is declared valid and will stand as rendered in the lower court.
  • Allegation: something that someone says happened.
  • Answer: The formal written statement by a defendant responding to a civil complaint and setting forth the grounds for defense.
  • Appellate: About appeals; an appellate court has the power to review the judgement of another lower court or tribunal.
  • Arraignment: A proceeding in which an individual who is accused of committing a crime is brought into court, told of the charges, and asked to plead guilty or not guilty.
  • Bail: Security given for the release of a criminal defendant or witness from legal custody (usually in the form of money) to secure his/her appearance on the day and time appointed.
  • Baseline: Projection of the receipts, outlays, and other budget amounts that would ensue in the future without any change in existing policy. Baseline projections are used to gauge the extent to which proposed legislation, if enacted into law, would alter current spending and revenue levels.
  • Charge to the jury: The judge's instructions to the jury concerning the law that applies to the facts of the case on trial.
  • Complaint: A written statement by the plaintiff stating the wrongs allegedly committed by the defendant.
  • Credit report: A detailed report of an individual's credit history prepared by a credit bureau and used by a lender in determining a loan applicant's creditworthiness. Source: OCC
  • Defendant: In a civil suit, the person complained against; in a criminal case, the person accused of the crime.
  • Discovery: Lawyers' examination, before trial, of facts and documents in possession of the opponents to help the lawyers prepare for trial.
  • Electronic funds transfer: The transfer of money between accounts by consumer electronic systems-such as automated teller machines (ATMs) and electronic payment of bills-rather than by check or cash. (Wire transfers, checks, drafts, and paper instruments do not fall into this category.) Source: OCC
  • Equitable: Pertaining to civil suits in "equity" rather than in "law." In English legal history, the courts of "law" could order the payment of damages and could afford no other remedy. See damages. A separate court of "equity" could order someone to do something or to cease to do something. See, e.g., injunction. In American jurisprudence, the federal courts have both legal and equitable power, but the distinction is still an important one. For example, a trial by jury is normally available in "law" cases but not in "equity" cases. Source: U.S. Courts
  • Gift: A voluntary transfer or conveyance of property without consideration, or for less than full and adequate consideration based on fair market value.
  • Grace period: The number of days you'll have to pay your bill for purchases in full without triggering a finance charge. Source: Federal Reserve
  • Grand jury: agreement providing that a lender will delay exercising its rights (in the case of a mortgage,
  • Hearsay: Statements by a witness who did not see or hear the incident in question but heard about it from someone else. Hearsay is usually not admissible as evidence in court.
  • Indictment: The formal charge issued by a grand jury stating that there is enough evidence that the defendant committed the crime to justify having a trial; it is used primarily for felonies.
  • Juror: A person who is on the jury.
  • Mistrial: An invalid trial, caused by fundamental error. When a mistrial is declared, the trial must start again from the selection of the jury.
  • Mortgage: The written agreement pledging property to a creditor as collateral for a loan.
  • New York State Energy Code: means the New York State Energy Conservation Construction Code (the "New York State Energy Code"), constituting part 1240 of title 19 of the New York codes, rules and regulations (19 NYCRR Part 1240), and the publications incorporated by reference in such part, promulgated on September 21, 2016, by the State Fire Prevention and Building Code Council pursuant to Article 11 of the New York State Energy Law. See N.Y. New York City Administrative Code 28-1001.1.1
  • Oath: A promise to tell the truth.
  • Partnership: A voluntary contract between two or more persons to pool some or all of their assets into a business, with the agreement that there will be a proportional sharing of profits and losses.
  • Plea: In a criminal case, the defendant's statement pleading "guilty" or "not guilty" in answer to the charges, a declaration made in open court.
  • Pre-trial motion: as used in this article means any motion by a defendant which seeks an order of the court:

    (a) dismissing or reducing an indictment pursuant to article 210 or removing an action to the family court pursuant to article 722; or

    (b) dismissing an information, prosecutor's information, simplified information or misdemeanor complaint pursuant to article 170; or

    * (c) granting discovery pursuant to article 240; or

    * NB Effective until January 1, 2020

    * (c) granting discovery pursuant to article 245; or

    * NB Effective January 1, 2020

    (d) granting a bill of particulars pursuant to sections 100. See N.Y. Criminal Procedure Law 255.10

  • Preliminary hearing: A hearing where the judge decides whether there is enough evidence to make the defendant have a trial.
  • Pro se: A Latin term meaning "on one's own behalf"; in courts, it refers to persons who present their own cases without lawyers.
  • Recess: A temporary interruption of the legislative business.
  • Testify: Answer questions in court.
  • Testimony: Evidence presented orally by witnesses during trials or before grand juries.
  • Transcript: A written, word-for-word record of what was said, either in a proceeding such as a trial or during some other conversation, as in a transcript of a hearing or oral deposition.
  • Trial: A hearing that takes place when the defendant pleads "not guilty" and witnesses are required to come to court to give evidence.
  • Trial jury: A group of citizens who hear the evidence presented by both sides at trial and determine the facts in dispute. Federal criminal juries consist of 12 persons. Federal civil juries consist of six persons.
  • Verdict: The decision of a petit jury or a judge.